Getting Hooked

Hooks are comprised of six parts, each serving and important and necessary function in crocheting.

A crochet hook is like a pencil to an artist; the possibilities are endless but only if they know how to utilize their tool. Each part of the hook plays an important and necessary role in crocheting.

When learning to crochet, the first step is getting comfortable with the crochet hook. There are six parts to a crochet hook, each playing a key role in helping you to create your project(ie. scarf, blanket). Learning these different parts to the hook will make you more familiar with how to crochet and also more comfortable.

 

Very similar to holding a pencil or pen, should be a firm grip.

The first part of the hook is the point, this is what will spearhead into the stitches made. Although a point is usually referred to a sharp end on a needle, this point is very dull and will not damage your yarn. The throat holds the loops to the yarn you’re working on. Often times, there will be multiple loops of yarn resting on this area of the hook as a holding place until you’re ready to link them together.

The groove is the midpoint between the throat and the point. This is where loops made from yarn must pass through before they rest on the throat of the hook. The shaft is meant to provide support when holding the hook. Which takes us to the last part, the handle. Although you probably will not be holding the hook from the handle, it balances the hook and keeps it from putting all the weight on one side.

One hand will the hold the hook like a pencil, while the other will support the yarn to be used

When holding the yarn with your support hand (left hand), it’s important not to have too tight of a grip. Holding the yarn too tight will result in your stitches not being even and your product will not come out consistent. You should hold the incoming yarn with your index and middle fingers, while placing you thumb, pinky and ring finger on the what you have crocheting so far; which in the picture on the left happens to be a chain stitch.

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